This Social Security calculator shows you how long you can expect to receive benefits

aging, longevity, Money & Credit, Retirement, Social Security


Death isn’t the most pleasant thing to think about. But the reality is that it will happen to all of us.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has a vested interest in the timing of your death. That’s because they’re responsible for making sure you receive timely monthly payments from the time you start claiming your Social Security benefits until you die, and even beyond in the case of survivor benefits.

RELATED: Are Social Security benefits going away? 

As a reminder, you can start claiming Social Security at age 62 — but money expert Clark Howard prefers that you wait until age 70 for a variety of reasons.

How to use the Social Security Life Expectancy Calculator

To help you understand how long you’re likely to live in retirement, the SSA has a life expectancy calculator on its website:

Just pop in your gender and your date of birth and you’ll get an estimate:

longevity calculator from social security

What the Social Security longevity calculator doesn’t take into account is current health, lifestyle and family history. Those factors can play a big role in either increasing or decreasing your life expectancy.

Here’s another longevity calculator that’s worth a look

For a more complete assessment, Blueprint Income has a robust longevity calculator developed by the University of Pennsylvania that you may want to give a try.

It includes questions about your age and physique, life events, fitness and lifestyle. You’ll get a customized life expectancy based on 400,000 data samples from the National Institutes of Health.

blueprint income longevity calculator

Final thought

If the results from these calculators have you concerned about providing for yourself and your family in your later years, a longevity insurance policy purchased at retirement age may be a smart choice for you.

More money & retirement stories on Clark.com





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