Personal Finance

Among the other points you should know: Under public service loan forgiveness, your debt is forgiven tax-free. Your private loans can’t be forgiven; only federal loans qualify for public service loan forgiveness. Kantrowitz said some people assume they’ll qualify for forgiveness after 10 years of payments. However, it’s not about how long you’ve been paying
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The economy, the Fed and inflation all have some influence over long-term fixed mortgage rates, which generally are pegged to yields on U.S. Treasury notes, so there’s already been a spike since the Fed started raising rates. The average 30-year fixed rate is now about 4.83 percent, up from 4.09 percent in 2015. That has
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Year-end planning has a whole new look now that a few popular tax deductions have gone away. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act raised the standard deduction and did away with personal exemptions and some of the most commonly used deductions, such as job-search expenses, the fees you pay your tax preparer, investment expenses and
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While many retirees say they are happy in retirement and have kept up their standard of living, those outstanding debts — in combination with other red flags, like reliance on Social Security as a main source of income and a lack of long-term care planning — point to the potential for problems, said Catherine Collinson,
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Robinhood’s news this week inspired a Twitter debate over FDIC versus SIPC coverage. And the most vocal critics of the limitations of SIPC coverage were financial advisors. Jude Boudreaux, partner and senior financial planner at The Planning Center, was one of them. Without more detail on Robinhood’s accounts, Boudreaux said there’s “no way” he would
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Now’s the time to make sure you have some basic estate planning documents and policies in place, including a will, power of attorney and life insurance, Boneparth said. “If you’ve been dragging your feet on that, now there’s virtually no excuse,” he said. “This is pure sleep-well-at-night stuff. “You can’t mess around,” he added. “There
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College-sponsored bank accounts ding students with millions of dollars in fees each year, according to a report by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The Education Department under President Donald Trump never published the analysis but advocacy groups recently obtained it through a Freedom of Information Act request. The bureau reviewed 573 colleges across the country
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